2.3.1 Parmenides ( 78v – 87v)

5.vii.20

Plato’s personal acquaintance Alexis comicus seems to have been familiar his fellow-self-colloquiser, who habitually paced up and down in ‘aporia’, or perplexity.       I may usefully bring to bear some remarks made to me [one self-colloquiser overhearing his fellow].   Here you will see some lore and wisdom from the OED, as if commenting on Alexis or on a doubled Ryle, self-colloquising like Plato.   Each persona or prosrhEma seems to want a self-doubling, or self-fellowing.  But this type of self-replication occurs in several locations in the later dialogues, once where the face seen in Theaetetus’ mirror was more than a mere look-alike, but a shade coming face-to-face with a fellowing self.

Wiggins no doubt can decode all of this, in- or outside of Plato.   E.R. Dodds in his colloquial memoir ‘Missing Persons’ adds a ‘demon’ who made use of the name Eric Robertson Dodds.   Did we once have two Theaetetuses?  Alexis and Plato appear to say Yes.    Dodds’s personae number at least two by his own count.   Nor are these provably only dreams or a form of experienced madness.   Ryle, during his late-1967 trip to my home in New Jersey was not fellowing his contemporary Dodds (who had still not published written his memoir about his own multiple selves).   Nor did Ryle admit his outloud self-colloquising.   He did, however, firmly reject my point that I sometimes talked to myself.  Until, that is,  I cited to Ryle my example of a well-dressed Manhattanite.   This same external man had committed the ‘allotriosynic’ act of interrupting the two of us, then and there in the late 1960s.

OED s v ‘fellow’, esp intrans (reflexive)

136 b7 – 137c7 – 138 d7 Parm TI DAI, Ibycus’s poem,many anomalies,odd ‘euqeos’

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Parmenides

the boundary separating text from marginalium:   often a porous boundary, with material leaking forward and backward over centuries of time.   Please see this sample from Ibycus  , by clicking here:    Note a few discrepancies between Ibycus’s wordings and this echoing, in or near or passing that boundary:

 

Lyric poet Ibycus’s lines located (as of Ephraim’s time) outside Plato’s text, but local to Ephraim’s marginalia.   John Cooper’s Complete Works Plato [Hackett], also inside his texts, presents a fine lyrical poet — in Plato’s lovely Love epigrams !    I sense something autobiographical here, linking real-life prize-winning aethletic lover (and also ‘aesthlosic’) — see Cooper’s edition of Love Epigram I) lover Plato to real-life tired Old-Man Plato.  We need only see under the surface here some equivalence relations.   Amphinomus=Philip=SocratesAlternate=ASTER!

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